tic tac and odds explained

Tic Tac

Tic-tac is the secret and complex sign language used by bookmakers at racecourses to indicate movements in the price of a horse.

Those plying this skill usually wear white gloves and stand on wooden crates so they can be easily seen. Here’s a brief video:

Words used by bookies to describe the odds:

Evens – “Levels”
11/10 – “Tips”
6/5  – “Sais A Ching
5/4 – “Wrist
11/8 – “Up the Arm
6/4 – “Ear ‘Ole
7/4 – “Shoulder
15/8, Double Tops
2/1 – “Bottle
9/4 – “Top of the head
5/2 – “Face
11/4  – “Elef a Vier
3/1 – “Carpet
10/3 – “Burlington Bertie
4/1 – “Rouf (four spelt backwards)
5/1,   Hand
9/2,   On the Shoulders
6/1,   Exes
7/1,   Neves (seven spelt backwards)
8/1,   T.H
9/1,   Enin (nine spelt backwards)
10/1, Cockle or Net (ten spelt backwards)
11/1, Elef
12/1, Net and Bice
14/1, Net and Rouf (10 and 4 spelt backwards)
16/1, Net and Ex
20/1, Double Net
25/1, Macaroni
25/1, Pony
33/1, Double Carpet
100/1, Century”

What you get back for your bet:

It’s easy: If you bet at 7-2 you’ll get three and a half to one: so if you staked £10 you would get £45 back (£35 plus your £10 stake back)

85/40 is just over 2 to 1; 100/30 or 10/3 is just over 3 to 1 and so on.

4-6 means you’d need to stake £6 to get back £10

6-4 gives you £25 for a £10 stake

There have been 500-1 winners and I once saw a horse placed at 1000-1. Personally never had a winner bigger than 66-1.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s